Date of Award

Summer 2003

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering - (M.S.)

Department

Biomedical Engineering Committee

First Advisor

Tara L. Alvarez

Second Advisor

Stanley S. Reisman

Third Advisor

Richard Greene

Abstract

To fixate on a target that moves from far to near, changes in blur and disparity activate accommodation and disparity vergence. The goal of this study was to experimentally obtain eye movement data from four subjects, and analyze this data using through a new signal processing algorithm known as independent component analysis (ICA). Preliminary data suggest that three underlying neural subcomponents are present where the two components of disparity vergence initiate the movement and the accommodative portion is activated to facilitate the steady state portion of the response.

ICA was used as a blind source separation technique to analyze experimental and simulated data. Loss of independence between the sustaining component and the accommodative component is speculated to cause ICA to be unable to determine the accommodative component.

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