Date of Award

Fall 10-31-1994

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering - (M.S.)

Department

Biomedical Engineering Committee

First Advisor

Stanley S. Reisman

Second Advisor

David S. Kristol

Third Advisor

Thomas W. Findley

Abstract

In this study, an alternative method, impedance pneumography was used to measure the respiration volume. The respiration volume was measured both by using a conventional spirometer and an impedance pneumograph, and evaluated quantitatively in 17 subjects using linear and nonlinear regression algorithms.

Data were collected from 17 normal, healthy subjects during rest and paced breathing conditions. A technique was developed to measure tidal volume by impedance pneumography. The respiration volume measured by the spirometer was correlated with the volume measured by the pneumograph. Different electrode positions and postures were included in the study to determine the position and posture which would yield optimum correlations.

Correlations between the tidal volume measured by the spirometer and the tidal volume measured by the pneumograph, the rates of respiration (exhalation and inhalation widths), and the means and standard deviations of the exhalation ranges were computed. Results showed high correlations between the two techniques used. The position of the electrodes played a major role in affecting correlations. It was concluded that the posterior electrode position yielded relatively high correlations for the seated and standing postures and that the lateral position yielded good correlations for the supine posture, but further exploration is necessary to determine other factors which would influence the results.

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