Date of Award

Spring 2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Occupational Safety and Health Engineering - (M.S.)

Department

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

First Advisor

Sengupta, Arijit K.

Second Advisor

Bladikas, Athanassios K.

Third Advisor

Lieber, Samuel

Abstract

Sedentary behavior has been increasingly identified as a contributor to poor health outcomes and sit-stand workstations (SSW) have been introduced in offices to potentially reduce these adverse effects. This thesis presents a review of literature on SSW as they relate to musculoskeletal complaints, sedentary behavior, users’ perception after short- and long-term use, productivity and cardiometabolic markers. To be included in the review, studies were required to include the adult working population subject to a sit-stand workstation intervention with above outcome measures. The review indicates that on an average, SSW has decreased sitting time by about 85 minutes per eight hour work day which was mostly utilized in increasing standing time during the workday. Studies found potential reduction in neck and shoulder discomfort using SSW with no negative impact on productivity. Employer support and ergonomics training appear to have a positive impact on the reception and use of sit-stand workstations. User perception after long term use of SSW is mostly positive. Long term longitudinal studies have found some improvements in the biomarkers related to obesity and cardiovascular diseases of the SSW user group, however, not all test results are significant. It can be concluded from this literature survey, that use of SSW has a strong potential in improving office workers’ health outcome with no adverse effects on productivity and musculoskeletal disorder.

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