Date of Award

Fall 1989

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Architecture - (M.Arch.)

Department

School of Architecture

First Advisor

Sanford R. Greenfield

Second Advisor

Michael Mostoller

Third Advisor

Peter C. Papademetriou

Abstract

This inquiry addresses some fundamental issues raised in a debate over the effectiveness of architecture studio instruction. It argues that as currently structured the studio's potential effectiveness is often unrealized, because of the paucity of standardized educational resources and instructor's lack of training in educational theories of instruction. This has resulted in instructional planning that is seldom structured on educational theory or research. It is also argued that in order to maximize it's effectiveness, beginning studio instruction must be premised upon a theory of instruction which includes specifying explicit instructional goals and objectives and that this would create a more effective learning environment.

These issues are addressed through an analysis of the body of research in architecture education and an analysis of the goals and objectives of a sample of architecture design studio handouts. Also, studio instruction is compared with other modes of instruction.

This analysis finds that although research in architecture education is growing, it has not been effectively applied in current architecture studio instruction. Also, instructor's intentions, goals and objectives for student learning in current studio instruction, are too implicit. However, the studio mode when compared to other modes of instruction is shown to be very effective when properly guided by principles of a model of instruction. Primarily this inquiry establishes a knowledge base and outlines both a theory and model of instruction for suggesting methods toward the creation of a more effective architectural studio pedagogy.

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Architecture Commons

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