Date of Award

Fall 1990

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Architecture - (M.Arch.)

Department

School of Architecture

First Advisor

Filiz Ozel

Second Advisor

David L. Hawk

Third Advisor

Glenn Goldman

Fourth Advisor

Mark A. Hewitt

Abstract

The design process is dependent on a clear order of integrating and managing all of the control parameters that impact on a building's design. All component elements of a building must be defined by their: Physical and functional relations; Quantitative and calculable properties; Component and/or system functions. This requires a means of representation to depict a model of a building that can be viewed and interpreted by a variety of interested parties. These parties need different types of representation to address their individual control parameters, as each component instance has specific implications on all of the control parameters.

Representations are prepared for periodic design review either manually through hand-drawn graphics and handcrafted models; or with the aid of computer aided design programs. Computer programs can profoundly increase the speed and accuracy of the process', as well as provide a level of integration, graphic representation and simulation, untenable through a manual process.

By maintaining a single control model in an Integrated Component-based Computer Design Modeling System (ICCDMS), interested parties could access the design model at any point during the process. Each party could either: 1. Analyze individual components, or constraints of the model, for interferences against parameters within that party's control; or 2. Explore design alternatives to modify the model, and verify the integration of the components or functions, within the design model, as allowable in relation to other control parameters.

Included in

Architecture Commons

Share

COinS