Date of Award

12-31-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering - (M.S.)

Department

Biomedical Engineering

First Advisor

S. Basuray

Second Advisor

Max Roman

Third Advisor

Vivek A. Kumar

Fourth Advisor

Roman S. Voronov

Abstract

The field of microfluidics and lab-on-chip (LOC) technology has the potential to have a truly transformative effect in biological engineering. This includes areas such as single-cell analysis, environmental monitoring, regenerative medicine, and point-of-care diagnostics. Yet despite being the subject of intense research over the past two decades, LOC devices have not been widely adopted. It is increasingly evident that there is a need for an effective and adaptable integration strategy to realize the potential of this technology.

Presented in this thesis is a design for a chip-to-world interface that aims to improve integration while maintaining cost-efficiency and ease of fabrication. This was achieved chiefly by using 3D printing to produce components that fit together precisely, minimizing the need for fasteners or adhesives during assembly. An accompanying LabVIEW program was written to automate some of the functions of the microfluidic device.

Experiments were then conducted to evaluate the integrity efficacy of the interface. First, solutions of food colorant dye and then fluorescent dye were passed through the chip to test for leaks. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was then used to take readings of three different solutions, potassium chloride (KCl), DNA, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), to test the responsiveness of the system and to evaluate its effectiveness as a biosensor.

The interface performed satisfactorily in all experiments, demonstrating its potential as an effective step towards a fully integrated microfluidic device.

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