Document Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

Fall 12-31-2018

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering - (Ph.D.)

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

First Advisor

Roberto Rojas-Cessa

Second Advisor

Nirwan Ansari

Third Advisor

John D. Carpinelli

Fourth Advisor

Ziqian Dong

Fifth Advisor

Qing Liu

Abstract

In this dissertation three load-balancing Clos-network packet switches that attain 100% throughput and forward cells in sequence are introduced. The configuration schemes and the in-sequence forwarding mechanisms devised for these switches are also introduced. Also proposed is the use of matrix analysis as a tool for throughput analysis.

In Chapter 2, a configuration scheme for a load-balancing Clos-network packet switch that has split central modules and buffers in between the split modules is introduced. This switch is called split-central-buffered Load-Balancing Clos-network (LBC) switch and it is cell based. The switch has four stages, namely input, central-input, central-output, and output stages. The proposed configuration scheme uses a pre-determined and periodic interconnection pattern in the input and split central modules to load-balance and route traffic. The LBC switch has low configuration complexity. The operation of the switch includes a mechanism applied at input and split-central modules to forward cells in sequence. The switch achieves 100% throughput under uniform and nonuniform admissible traffic with independent and identical distributions (i.i.d.). The high switching performance and low complexity of the switch are achieved while performing in-sequence forwarding and without resorting to memory speedup or central-stage expansion. This discussion includes both throughput analysis, where the operations that the configuration mechanism performs on the traffic traversing the switch are described, and a proof of in-sequence forwarding. Simulation analysis is presented as a practical demonstration of the switch performance on uniform and nonuniform i.i.d. traffic.In Chapter 3, a three-stage load balancing packet switch and its configuration scheme are introduced. The input- and central-stage switches are bufferless crossbars and the output-stage switches are buffered crossbars. This switch is called ThRee-stage Clos-network swItch and has queues at the middle stage and DEtermiNisTic scheduling (TRIDENT) and it is cell based. The proposed configuration scheme uses a pre-determined and periodic interconnection pattern in the input and central modules to load-balance and route traffic; therefore, it has low configuration complexity. The operation of the switch includes a mechanism applied at input and output modules to forward cells in sequence.

In Chapter 4, a highly scalable load balancing three-stage Clos-network switch with Virtual Input-module output queues at ceNtral stagE (VINE) and crosspoint-buffers at output modules and its configuration scheme are introduced. VINE uses space switching in the first stage and buffered crossbars in the second and third stages. The proposed configuration scheme uses pre-determined and periodic interconnection patterns in the input modules for load balancing. The mechanism applied at the inputs, used to forward cells in sequence, is also introduced. VINE achieves 100% throughput under uniform and nonuniform admissible i.i.d. traffic. VINE achieves high switching performance, low configuration complexity, and in-sequence forwarding without resorting to memory speedup.

In Chapter 5, matrix analysis is introduced as a tool for modeling, describing the internal operations, and analyzing the throughput of a packet switch.

Share

COinS